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Office hours occur on M-Th. If you wish to see me during lunch, you must sign up. There are 2 time slots: 12:15-12:30 and 12:30-12:45. You must post before 11:00 a.m. for a same day visit. 

First post, first served. If you happen to sign up for a day and time that someone had previously reserved, you may still come in but will not be guaranteed face time. Sign up by commenting on this post. Make sure to leave your name, date and time you wish to come. Additional information as to the nature of the visit will help me prepare materials for you. Format your comment like this:

William Shakespeare – August 18, 12:30-12:45 – Need help with sentence length in my essay.

8/29 office hours booked: 12:15-12:30 – JR, 12:30-12:45 – KK

 

 

August 28, 2014

APLC: Discuss effectiveness of articles. Students participated in a Socratic Seminar based on the articles found on pages 30-33.

HW: Analyze the rhetorical situation, appeals and effectiveness of the Rand article on page 33.

11th: Write argumentative in-class essay. Student wrote an in-class essay agreeing/disagreeing with the following statement – “The terms of the treaty were fair.” Students submitted their outlines and were credited for their work.

August 26, 2014

APLC: Apply SOAPS. Analyze rhetorical appeals. Determine effectiveness. Groups discussed the activities on pages 27 and 29. Students were introduced to Socratic Seminar Norms. There will be a socratic seminar on the essays on pages 30-33 tomorrow. Students are to take notes on the rhetorical situation, rhetorical appeals and effectiveness.

HW: Read 30-33, take notes on the rhetorical situation, rhetorical appeals and effectiveness of the two essays.

11th: Identify thesis, claims and counterclaims. Students read “Why Prisons Don’t Work” and identified thesis, claims and counterclaims. Students worked in groups to fill in a graphic organizer (photo) showing their understanding of key parts to an argumentative essay. Students will fill in the graphic organizer to support/challenge the statement: The terms of the peace treaty were fair. This is a statement the students discussed yesterday. And this statement will be the focus of their in class timed write tomorrow.

HW: Complete outline for essay.

August 26, 2014

APLC: Evaluate Essays. Teacher reviewed aspects of a strong paper and descriptors of rubric. Students read an anchor paper for the essay to calibrate their evaluative process. Students read 2 student papers and completed a PQP (Praise – Question – Response). After reading a paper, students praised the paper, questioned a claim for development and gave a suggestion for polishing. 

HW: Revise essay (Due 9/2). 

11th: Evaluate fairness of treaty. Students first reviewed their answers for page 11 in the Interactive Reader. Students shared their understanding of Bradford’s biases and assumptions. Students then took that information and wrote sentences that integrated quotes. Sentences could use the following format: William Bradford assumes ___ when he says “____”(#). Groups took these sentences and posted them as comments on the blog. I went over the responses and commented on areas of strength and weakness. In groups, students then looked at the terms of the treaty and determined fairness.

August 25, 2014

APLC: Identify SOAPS in Fiction. Students were introduced to the idea of rhetorically analyzing a piece of fiction. Students then worked in groups to identify SOAPS in Dimmsdale’s words to Hester in chapter 3 of The Scarlet Letter. Groups posted their work online. Students will need to respond to one of the groups posts by 1) give one praise about the response 2) pose a question about the response 3) suggest a way for polishing/improvement

HW: Read 23-29. Complete activities on page 27 and 29. 

11th: Present Eras of LIfe. Summarize sections. Students learned how to work the clicker response systems. Students took a quiz on Of Plymouth Plantation (formative assessment) using the clickers. Students were then guided through the summarizing and primary source activities on page 10-11 in their Interactive Reader. Some students presented their era’s of life powerpoint.

HW: Finish activities on page 10-11 in Interactive Reader.

August 25, 2014 – APLC: Group Post

Apply SOAPS to Dimmesdale’s words from Chapter 3 of The Scarlet Letter. Post your group’s response as a comment. You can only post once for your group.

  Such was the young man whom the Reverend Mr. Wilson and the Governor had introduced so openly to the public notice, bidding him speak, in the hearing of all men, to that mystery of a woman’s soul, so sacred even in its pollution. The trying nature of his position drove the blood from his cheek, and made his lips tremulous.   23
  “Speak to the woman, my brother,” said Mr. Wilson. “It is of moment to her soul, and therefore, as the worshipful Governor says, momentous to thine own, in whose charge hers is. Exhort her to confess the truth!”   24
  The Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale bent his head, in silent prayer, as it seemed, and then came forward.   25
  “Hester Prynne,” said he, leaning over the balcony, and looking down stedfastly into her eyes, “thou hearest what this good man says, and seest the accountability under which I labor. If thou feelest it to be for thy soul’s peace, and that thy earthly punishment will thereby be made more effectual to salvation, I charge thee to speak out the name of thy fellow-sinner and fellow-sufferer! Be not silent from any mistaken pity and tenderness for him; for, believe me, Hester, though he were to step down from a high place, and stand there beside thee, on thy pedestal of shame, yet better were it so, than to hide a guilty heart through life. What can thy silence do for him, except it tempt him—yea, compel him, as it were—to add hypocrisy to sin? Heaven hath granted thee an open ignominy, that thereby thou mayest work out an open triumph over the evil within thee, and the sorrow without. Take heed how thou deniest to him—who, perchance, hath not the courage to grasp it for himself—the bitter, but wholesome, cup that is now presented to thy lips!”
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